Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College


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Can Swarthmore Be Bottled?

He was genuinely interested in students and likely to be more disturbed by inferior academic accomplishment than a student himself. Adept in understanding the undergraduate mind, he showed unusual proficiency in counseling and guidance problems, and in he was chosen dean of the College for Men. Three years later he fell dead in his Morey Hall office; mourning friends contributed funds for a portrait of a lovable and well-rounded scholar.

Coates, Arthur J. May, and Glyndon G. Van Deusen, class of Led by Professor Dexter Perkins, this close-knit little band remained intact, remarkably enough, until when Mackenzie in the prime of life was cut down by death; his colleagues kept pegging away at the U. Then they entered upon the delights, the luxury no less, of growing old.

A medievalist, Mackenzie was extraordinarily successful in teaching women. No faculty man, indeed, commanded comparable respect and esteem at the College for Women, as was witnessed in one way by the repeated dedication of the Croceus to "the kindest master of all the Convoy Crew. Papal envoys to thirteenth century England was the subject of his scholarly researches, and he had virtually finished a learned volume on that theme when he died. Former students and faculty friends established two Hugh Mackenzie Prizes to be handed out to the woman of highest achievement in the introductory course in history--in the presentation of which Mackenzie had excelled--and to the student who had shown the greatest improvement in that course.

Befitting the beneficiary of a Rhodes Scholarship at Queen's College, Oxford, Coates displayed exceptional talent for challenging the brightest youths who elected British or western intellectual history and for stimulating advanced students whom he guided through the intricacies of the philosophy of history.

The humane intelligence of Coates was abundantly demonstrated in a two-volume intellectual history of western Europe which he co-authored. Besides, he was a founding-father and first editor of The Journal of British Studies , a learned publication that won acclaim on both sides of the Atlantic. May specialized in the modern history of Europe--more particularly the Danubian region--with the Orient as a sideline. His books on the Hapsburg Monarchy brought him scholarly awards and an international reputation; he also lectured before university audiences and learned societies in several European countries.

Concerning his classroom role--and he taught more students than any other academic teacher in U. Although trained in European history, Van Deusen shifted his allegiance to the history of the United States, making himself an outstanding authority on the so-called middle period. A man who fully personified the highest ideals and attainments in the art of teaching and scholarly productivity, Van Deusen composed the standard biographies of Henry Clay, Thurlow Weed, Horace Greeley which was crowned by the Beveridge Prize of the American Historical Association , and William H.

Beyond that, he contributed liberally to learned periodicals, held a Fulbright Professorship in New Zealand, and taught for a session at the famous Salzburg Austria Seminar in American Studies. McGill was attached to the history group, but in his special area of knowledge, government or political science , was set off as a distinct department with him at the head.

Notwithstanding a severe physical handicap resulting from infantile paralysis, he proved a provocative teacher of American constitutional law and political parties, intent on preparing students for effective participation in a rapidly evolving democratic society; what he taught he practiced, serving as president of the Rochester Board of Education for a term.


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At his death in , more than of his friends and former students contributed to a memorial fund, which was used to endow a McGill Prize in Government and to purchase a plaque on which the names of the annual prize-winners would be inscribed. As of the tablet hung on the third floor of Harkness Hall.

Year One (Swarthmore)

Psychology, which was divorced from education, was taught both at the College and at the Institute of Optics by William Berry. Described as "a stimulating teacher" by one of the most distinguished men who sat at his feet, Berry was concerned to make the minds of students more efficient, less subject to passing whims and fancies; his special domains were experimental psychology and the psycho-physiology of vision.

After rendering fourteen years of useful service at Rochester, his resignation was uncompromisingly demanded--a case of the mailed fist concealed in the velvet glove of President Valentine. If, as the administration claimed, Berry's professional qualifications were not up to U. His younger colleague, Eliot D. Hutchinson, invoked hypnosis in instruction at a time when it was neither popular nor even respectable to do so; his aim was to stir indolent undergraduates into productive activity.

Studies that Hutchinson carried on in social and applied psychology flowered in a valuable book, How to Think Creatively. The instruction in education--better designated "pedagogy"--improved sharply after the appointment of Earl B. Taylor, class of , a successful superintendent of schools in the nearby community of LeRoy.

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This dynamic executive also administered the Extension Division and the Summer Session, and was mainly responsible for the formation in of the Division of University Extension which offered a degree of its own; two years later the Division was reorganized as the University School of Liberal and Applied Studies. Mathematician T. Richard Long, , earned the deathless affection of a multitude of Rochester undergraduates whom he taught and befriended.

Genial and easily approachable, he was, nonetheless, a stern taskmaster in the classroom. Yet, if a student would apply himself to the best of his ability, he found in Long an extremely patient and helpful mentor. In his will he bequeathed his estate to the University which he had served with exemplary devotion, to provide scholarly aid to worthy young men from the city of Rochester. Turning next to the natural scientists who were appointed in the twenties, J. Edward Hoffmeister stands out for his achievements as teacher, administrator, and research worker.

His record at Rochester resembled in fact the framework of a fine novel, building up to a high climax, and then tapering off to a logical conclusion.

Authors of Their Own Lives

He arrived in with a Ph. Hoffmeister was a classroom personality par excellence and outstanding in faculty committee work, and those qualities coupled with a strong personality and a friendly disposition led to his selection first as dean of the College for Men and then as dean of the College of Arts and Science He was heavily involved in community organizations, and, like Gilbert, he was seriously considered in trustee circles in for the U.

In the early phase of his Rochester tenure, Hoffmeister engaged in scientific expeditions to learn more about corals in the southern Pacific, which resulted in scientific publications. Upon relinquishing the deanship he reverted to his first loves--teaching and productive research, and upon official retirement in he continued his investigations on the staff of the Institute of Marine Science attached to the University of Miami, Florida.

Swarthmore. College Bulletin

His discoveries there wrought with revolutionary force upon significant aspects of geology in the Florida-Bahama area. Singewald, made himself an expert on mineralogy and the mineral resources of the Americas and the Soviet Union. Opportunities in biology were broadened by the coming of J. Douglas Hood and Sherman C. Hood became a world authority on the classification of plants and insects according to their natural relationships. On many wide-ranging missions he accumulated a large collection of thysanoptera, an order of minute insects popularly known as thrips, which are often injurious to garden and farm; Hood personally discovered about fifty previously unknown species.

Among honors conferred upon him was membership in the Royal Entomology Society of London. For twenty-three years, Bishop instructed and worked at research at Rochester, producing papers, leaving out of account studies unfinished at the time of his death. Basically a zoologist, knowledgeable about both warm-blooded and cold-blooded vertebrates, he is remembered for extra ordinary familiarity with the forms, colors, and ways of animals. He trained more than twenty professional scientists in his specialty. Russell Wilkins acted as director of the Institute of Applied Optics in its formative stage.

His searches to wrest from nature the intimate secrets of cosmic rays and his papers on atomic disintegration attracted national attention, and he discovered a process by which to photograph the changes resulting from smashing the atom. Learned articles that he prepared dealt with radioactivity, atomic physics, and photography.

An enthusiastic scientist, he communicated his ardor both to students and inquiring laymen. An alumna, Ethel L.

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French, , who started her academic career as an assistant in chemistry, advanced to a senior professorship--the only woman in chemistry to attain that rank and the first woman to earn a Rochester Ph. As a teacher of inorganic and analytical chemistry and as a student advisor, she inspired many an undergraduate to develop her potentialities to the full. Her researches were focused on chemical problems related to teeth. Gavett was placed at the head of the department To a fine personality and a logical mind, he united lofty educational principles, insisting, for instance, that engineering undergraduates should include liberal, culturally and intellectually broadening subjects in their programs.

Both for himself and for embryonic engineers Gavett set exacting standards, and he gave a distinctive course on the principles of the engineering profession. He excelled in unraveling the mysteries of thermodynamics and heat engines.

Beyond that, he knitted close technical bonds with leading Rochester industries, which were mutually profitable. Since Gavett bore the heaviest burden of planning the new engineering complex on the River Campus, it was peculiarly fitting that his name should have been placed on its major unit.


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From Cornell, Gavett brought with him Horace W. Leet who taught mechanical engineering at the U. His responsibilities covered machine drawing, structural design, and the kinematics of machines. After attaining emeritus status, Leet continued to teach the professional engineering course. She conceived of physical training not only as a means of maintaining curricular balance but also as a method of instilling confidence and learning enjoyment of sports that would carry over into the years after graduation. In the course of her long tenure she was instrumental in planning new athletic facilities for women, after the decision was made to reunify the two colleges.

At her side for thirty years was Hazel J. Wilbraham, , affectionately known as "Gram" by generations of admiring women students. She had a large part in devising and then in directing cooperative dormitories on the Prince Street Campus. Two strong and sunny personalities taught physical education to men for more than three decades each and exerted a profound influence upon thousands of undergraduates: Walter Campbell and Roman L.

While Campbell coached tennis and soccer--and he was eminently successful--Speegle directed track and swimming teams. Over the years both men regaled audiences at college functions with their musical hobbies; Campbell, a tenor, is remembered as a confirmed addict of "barber-shop" singing, while Speegle performed meritoriously on the guitar, to the invariable delight of all assembled.

Undergraduate feathers--as well as those of sports writers on Rochester newspapers-were badly ruffled when the contract of Frank H. Gorton, hard-boiled, popular track coach for twelve years, was terminated , ostensibly because of departmental reorganization. Thus, in after prolonged debate and travail, the two-semester year replaced the historic three-term pattern. As for the curriculum, it was twice revised in the 'twenties, and there was no little tinkering, pointed toward reduction in required subjects, along the way.

At the outset of the decade undergraduates might choose between five programs: a B. A curricular reformation effected in grouped the departments of learning in three categories: languages and literature, social studies, and the sciences. A minimum amount of distribution was prescribed in each of the three divisions and two years of physical education and hygiene were required of everyone. For graduation two units of measurement were adopted; hours of credit and points of credit, with no points allowed for academic performance below a "C" level.

Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College
Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College
Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College
Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College
Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College
Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College
Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College
Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College
Transforming Campus Culture: Frank Aydelottes Honors Experiment at Swarthmore College

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